78

According to Wizards of the Coast at the time, the tweets were "official"2 I think it is important to note that the twitter account is "official." It can be argued whether or not a tweet is an official "ruling," however, in each case, or whether these rulings become "RAW." Also note that a search through for "Sage Advice" in my Player's Handbook and ...


66

The D&D 3.5 FAQ inherited the reputation of its predecessor, the “Sage Advice” column in Dragon magazine. The Dungeons & Dragons product line has long had two channels for rules corrections and clarifications: errata and Q&A. Rules errata are edited into the rulebooks themselves and published in later printings. The Q&A channel was originally ...


61

In brief, the problem with the FAQ is that it often answers these frequently-asked questions incorrectly. Even though it is an “official” publication of Wizards of the Coast, it is not, and was never intended to be, a source of authoritative rulings or carefully-considered implementation suggestions. It was intended to be a quick source of clarification, as ...


46

Some people (incorrectly) conflate Jeremy Crawford's rulings with the rules because he is empowered to make official rulings Who is Jeremy Crawford? Jeremy Crawford is, according to his Twitter bio: Lead rules designer of Dungeons & Dragons, lead designer of the Player's Handbook, and the game's managing editor Crawford's tweets are no longer ...


46

No, official rulings now come only from the published Sage Advice Compendium Previously, the Sage Advice Compendium has said this concerning the sources of official rulings: Official rulings on how to interpret unclear rules are made in Sage Advice. The public statements of the D&D team, or anyone else at Wizards of the Coast, are not official ...


44

No, RAW are the rules as written in books and the errata only Crawford makes rulings, not rules1 Jeremy Crawford makes rulings in the Sage Advice Compendium. He does not make rules there. Official rulings on how to interpret rules are made here in the Sage Advice Compendium by the game’s lead rules designer, Jeremy Crawford (@JeremyECrawford on Twitter)....


40

According to Mike Mearls, Wizards of the Coast does their design and layout in Adobe InDesign, which is the industry standard for any sort of graphical book publishing. InDesign is a layout program designed primarily for combining graphics and text together. Microsoft Word, which is a word processing program, is designed primarily for manipulating text, ...


32

Per the description at the top of the Sage Advice Compendium: These are the official rulings of Jeremy Crawford, the game’s lead rules developer. Other pages on the Wizards of the Coast website also refer to Sage Advice as "official rules answers" or "official clarifications of D&D rules". It's definitely an official, first-party source. (D&D ...


28

It seems to be a mistake in the file. There is nothing special going on that I can see, so the number is likely just wrong. I don't know of any rule in the game that would be able to change an attribute modifier.


26

Many find the Main FAQ a poor source for rules clarifications because sometimes it's wrong, changes the rules, or suggests impractical solutions The Main FAQ should be your friend. It should be helpful and trustworthy. But, sometimes, what the Main FAQ says or suggests is just so out there—so unbelievably weird or wrong—that its credibility withers. Known ...


20

Go to: https://wizards.custhelp.com/app/ask, Login or create an account, then select the appropriate product, then fill in the needed info. They should get back to you.


15

A set of errata for D&D 5e corebooks have been published, directly to a news article from which they can be downloaded: Errata for the Monster Manual and Dungeon Master's Guide. (Despite the name, the PHB errata can also be found there.) The direct link to the PDFs are here for the PHB, DMG, and MM. This article also contains a link to the Sage Advice ...


14

Probably not According to the description given in the rules-as-written tag, rules as written refers to the rules as they appear in the text. Crawford's rulings are, firstly, only rulings. They're official rulings, and are official interpretations of the rules, but are not themselves rules. As per Why do Crawford's tweets seem to be treated on par with the ...


14

Presuming that D&D Beyond qualifies1 as a “Twitch Service” under the Twitch TOS, then this is the controlling license text from §8(a)(i) (“User Content”, “License to Twitch”): Unless otherwise agreed to […], if you submit, transmit, display, perform, post or store User Content using the Twitch Services, you grant Twitch and its sublicensees an ...


14

The primary complaints against the D&D FAQ (and identically to the Sage Advice column and the Rules Compendium) come from a certain perspective on gaming. Since folks are trying to draw analogies to how the 5e design team's advice should be taken, I think it's worth unpacking these perspectives a little. Legalistic vs Practical There are two primary ...


13

I found what you were looking for! This blog led me to the podcast link. Excerpt: On the latest WOTC D&D podcast, Steve Winter talked about the great campaign-world books that came out of Second Edition D&D. He said that, for every kick-ass setting like Planescape or Al'Quadim, they had a bunch of ideas just as good - they just didn't have ...


10

Several 5e designers have addressed rules questions over twitter—Jeremy Crawford, Mike Mearls, Chris Perkins and Rodney Thompson.1 However, Mearls stated in his reddit AMA that his answers are in his experience only and Crawford is the "official rules expert." Perkins also tweeted that Crawford is the "resident rules sage" and affirmed that Crawford provides ...


9

After some archive.org crawling, I came across this post, a "Quick Links" to unofficial PrCs. It lists the following as Contest Winners: The Scarecrow Scarlet Squirrel Longblades Since the last entry is corroborated by your ENWorld link, the Wizards archive page specifies there were to be three winners, and discussion elsewhere in the thread mentions the "...


9

Stores and some conventions use the DCI# to track player attendance. Stores can report it to increase their WPN (Wizards Play Network) level. Some conventions use it to track player attendance as well, but it's not necessary. Ultimately there's no direct benefit for a player to have one, other than to help their local store with their WPN level.


8

Wizards of the Coast's D&D support site has a Submit a Request page that explicitly includes Permission Request. When you pull up Permission Request, it also includes a link to the Fan Content Policy.


8

In addition to Erik's answer, I would like to confirm that the mistake is in the (+0) indeed. It could be that the mistake was at the 8 STR instead, but it follows that: 15 Charisma, 14 Dex, 13 Int, 12 Wis, 10 Con and 8 STR give you exactly the standard array. The +2 Dex, +1 Cha from Drow then puts it into 16 Dex, 16 Cha, and finally the +2 ASI from 4th ...


7

Human error that simply hasn't been fixed. The only reason why a 10 or an 11 would be a +1 modifier is because at some point someone made a mistake and it just hasn't been fixed. Either because no one wanted to change it from the original that way everyone is using the same one, or because its just a small thing that's been getting overlooked. Even magic ...


7

The most recent version of the Sage Advice Compendium should contain a list of links to errata for individual books Frustratingly, Wizards do not appear to be maintaining a single up-to-date reference page which lists all the current errata or how to find it; errata is published in individual articles in the "Sage Advice" section of the WotC website, and ...


6

The D&D Beyond versions of the books include all art from those books The compendium content of each adventure on D&D Beyond is an online browsable version of that adventure. It contains not only the adventure text, but also cross-links and tooltips for monsters, mundane or magical items, spells, and relevant rules mentioned in the text... But most ...


5

Answer: Because of how the forums have changed, the author of the Dragonfire Adept handbook never updated the page and the page itself has not been saved. That link goes to a http://gleemax.com page. Gleemax was the old community website that Wizards ran in 2007 and 2008. With the advert of 4th Edition Dungeons and Dragons they replaced it with D&D ...


5

They should not be, based on Crawford's own words In January of 2016, Jeremy Crawford pointed out that sometimes when he makes a response via a tweet, he doesn't get it quite right. {Bolding mine, for emphasis}. Taking a Second Look at a Ruling I’m constantly revisiting the rules of the game. As a DM, I use them in the games I run. As a designer ...


4

It looks like you actually have two questions here. Mike already answered that Wizards uses Adobe InDesign to do the layout of the books and is pretty heavily invested in Adobe Creative Cloud's platform as a whole. Adobe Creative Cloud's team actually interviewed Crawford and several other Wizards staff members in this video from July. Your second question ...


2

It really depends on how your DM runs the campaign and how your party decides to proceed. It's not possible to give you an itemized breakdown because I am familiar with SKT as a player, not a DM, and your campaign experience will be unique. That said, as laid out by the book: Humanoids appear very frequently because you will encounter them both in towns ...


2

Not any more. Wizards of the Coast has moved on to 5th edition, and in their tradition they ceased all rule support of old editions: Game Support no longer answers rules questions about the 4th edition of Dungeons & Dragons. Adventurer's League and D&D Beyond, for example, specifically runs on and only on fifth edition. In fact, the many ...


2

You can find these on the wayback machine at archive.org: Dragonfire adept handbook First update Second update


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