5
\$\begingroup\$

Teleport takes you to a designated location, not a relative position - you can't teleport to "Latitude 52 Longitude 18" without knowing what is there. Dimension door does allow you to teleport to a relative position (e.g. "82 feet north and 27 feet west"), but it has a very limited range.

Is there a way to teleport to an arbitrary location without being familiar with it? So that, for instance, you could tell your wizard friend "meet me at [coords]", and they would be able to do so without having to scry it first?

Note that a coordinate system is not the point! The point is that a wizard who has visited town A and B can teleport directly to them, but he can't teleport to midway between them. He can see them on a map, and he knows roughly how far apart they are, and can teleport from one to the other - but not from one to halfway to the other.

The teleport spell requires a visual description of a location. You can't teleport to "5 miles that way" or "the other side of that hill" or "halfway between A and B" or "30 miles due north of Neverwinter". Not unless you've already seen it, or someone who has can describe it to you. I'm asking if there is an alternative method of teleporting, which would allow you to specify the location by some means other than picturing it visually.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ <comments removed> Comments aren’t for debating whether D&D worlds have lat/long coordinates. \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Aug 10 '18 at 15:33
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ (The dungeons-and-dragons tag is used for gamewide questions about that collection of systems and editions—for, like, lore and history and such. Just so you know. So it's, I think—unless I'm missing something—, an inapplicable tag here.) \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Aug 10 '18 at 15:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Louis Consider posing a similar question for 5e if the asker soon doesn't and self-answering it with your now-deleted answer. No reason for your effort to be wasted! \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Aug 10 '18 at 15:43
2
\$\begingroup\$

Interplanetary teleport is a spell that matches your requirements. It functions as teleport, except that it allows you to teleport to a location you haven't seen; and unlike greater teleport, it doesn't require a reliable description of your destination: By RAW, as long as you "have a specific destination in mind," the spell takes you there with no chance of failure, no matter whether you have a visual description of that destination or not.

Despite the name, interplanetary teleport can be used to teleport from one part of a planet to another part of the same planet without problems.

And yes, it is a real Pathfinder spell. You'll find it on page 225 of Ultimate Magic.

\$\endgroup\$
3
\$\begingroup\$

Possibly Greater Teleport

Greater Teleport allows to travel to a place you have never seen before:

This spell functions like teleport, except that there is no range limit and there is no chance you arrive off target. In addition, you need not have seen the destination, but in that case you must have at least a reliable description of the place to which you are teleporting. If you attempt to teleport with insufficient information (or with misleading information), you disappear and simply reappear in your original location. Interplanar travel is not possible.

Considering there very little that changes from Teleport's description, at best it could be used to thwart the GM's plans for the campaign, when the group teleports exactly to the middle of the villain's lair. But that's nothing that couldn't be done with a Scrying + Teleport combo already, which should be your first option to avoid getting teleported into unwanted places.

However, note that what is "reliable information" and "insufficient information" is left at GM discretion, we have vague information about what those would mean for the regular Teleport spell, which requires a clear visual description of the place you want to go, but since the greater version of the spell simply says you don't require to have seen it before, we cannot tell you what kind description is enough for the spell to work.

Alternatively, you could Share Memories (or similar mind reading ability) with a person who has been to the place you want, which would give you a clear description of the place. So a hunter or farmer, or even a traveller merchant could be enough to satisfy the spell.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ That greater teleport still necessitates a reliable description (a phrase that a GM can manipulate to his sinister heart's content) may mean this spell doesn't satisfy the asker's needs. \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Aug 10 '18 at 16:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ @HeyICanChan how could the GM manipulate something like: I want teleport to the exact middle distance between town A and town B? Unless, of course, there are other towns with those names. \$\endgroup\$ – ShadowKras Aug 10 '18 at 16:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ShadowKras Not that phrase, the phrase “reliable description”. \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Aug 10 '18 at 16:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ @SevenSidedDie That's not something really set in stone, as we know that you can teleport to a similar location if not enough description is given: Similar Area: You wind up in an area that’s visually or thematically similar to the target area. Generally, you appear in the closest similar place within range. If no such area exists within the spell’s range, the spell simply fails instead. \$\endgroup\$ – ShadowKras Aug 10 '18 at 16:34
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Right. That's why I said a GM can manipulate that phrase. (Truth be told, since I think being able to teleport blind is—seriously—an effect that's extremely likely to destroy any campaign I run, my house rules define reliable description to mean 100% accurate, making it so folks pretty much have to delve into a creature's mind to get one!) \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Aug 10 '18 at 16:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.