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The Battlemind power Lodestone Lure states: (emphasis added)

Hit: Constitution modifier damage, and you must pull the target 1 square. Until the end of your next turn, the target can move only to squares that are adjacent to you.

If you cannot pull the target, for example if the target is already adjacent to you, can you use the power? Likewise, can the augment 2 version ("must pull the target 4 squares") be used on a target fewer than 4 squares away?

The rule for forced movement seems to refer to cases where you can use "up to" the amount of forced movement in cases where the wording says, eg, "pull 4" or "pull up to 4." But I can't seem to find a rule about "must pull 4." Is there any ruling that can clarify this issue?

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You can try to pull a target that's already adjacent to you.

That pull will result in no movement and 'fail' in that sense, but that's different than not pulling - you don't get to choose if you'll pull or not, but pulls that don't result in any movement (say, the target is a dwarf with the related feature, or some magic item that prevents forced movement, or some physical barrier) still count as a valid pull-attempts, even if you deliberately choose a target that won't get pulled if you try.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Correct. If it meant you couldn't target adjacent foes the power would explicitly say so. \$\endgroup\$ – Oblivious Sage Sep 20 '14 at 22:21
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Just to note the power doesn't actually say you MUST pull the target, it says;

Hit: Constitution modifier damage, and you pull the target 1 square.

Or 4 squares if you augment by 1 or 2.

To answer the second part of your question. The RAW for forced movement states;

Distance in Squares: The power you’re using specifies how many squares you can move a target. You can choose to move the target fewer squares or not to move it at all. You can’t move the target vertically.

Even if the power says you pull the target X squares you can move them fewer if you choose.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is incorrect- it was errataed to say must. \$\endgroup\$ – JLan Sep 22 '14 at 15:18

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