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It's the same as this question, but the Readied Attack Action is used in your own turn, so all the answers for this other question, as well as its dupes, aren't valid any more, as they are based on the fact that the Extra Attack only works in your turn. This comes from this answer, where this Readied Attack Action is used to hit an enemy while you fall, which arguably wouldn't be possible using the Attack Action. This means you are attacking during your turn using the readied attack.

The Ready Action states

Sometimes you want to get the jump on a foe or wait for a particular circumstance before you act. To do so, you can take the Ready action on your turn, which lets you act using your reaction before the start of your next turn.

First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your speed in response to it. Examples include “If the cultist steps on the trapdoor, I'll pull the lever that opens it,” and “If the goblin steps next to me, I move away.”

When the trigger occurs, you can either take your reaction right after the trigger finishes or ignore the trigger. Remember that you can take only one reaction per round.

The Extra Attack feature states

Beginning at 5th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack Action on your turn.

So, my doubt is: being a reaction, does it still count as an Attack Action? The reason I'm confused is that a reaction is not exactly an action, for example, reaction spells can't be used as actions or vice-versa.

Clarifying: I know you can use your readied action in your own turn, which is what is covered here if I didn't miss any thing. The question is about the nature of the attack you are using in your turn. If you ready an attack and use it in your own turn, does it count as an Attack Action or just an attack? I.e., does it trigger Extra Attack (and any other features that trigger when you "take the Attack Action") or no?


Extra argument for the confusion: readying a spell is clearly different from the Cast a Spell action, as it takes concentration and spends the spell slot even if you don't use the spell at all.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Possible duplicate of How does the Ready action work in D&D 5e? \$\endgroup\$ – goodguy5 May 29 '18 at 14:49
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    \$\begingroup\$ @goodguy5 I don't see how this other question answers mine in any way. The question is: is the Reaction generated by the Ready Action an Attack Action or just "an attack"? This is not covered anywhere in the linked question, or I'm missing something? \$\endgroup\$ – HellSaint May 29 '18 at 15:19
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    \$\begingroup\$ @goodguy5 That's the first question I mention - this is different because that question and consequently its answers assume the reaction is taken in another creature's turn. In my question, I'm taking the reaction in my own turn, making the question and, possibly, the answers different. \$\endgroup\$ – HellSaint May 29 '18 at 15:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ Related on Do you get all your attacks if you ready an atack action? and the original it was duped as. \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch May 29 '18 at 15:40
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    \$\begingroup\$ Is there any in-game situation where taking a Ready Action just to trigger it and attack the same turn is more advantageous to taking just the Attack Action? \$\endgroup\$ – FenrirG May 29 '18 at 22:42
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Yes

Ready action requires (emphasis mine):

First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your speed in response to it.

The general rule is 1 Action per turn, but then specific rules can override that (e.g. Action Surge, Haste, etc.). I believe that Ready is another specific rule that overrides this as well because while you are using your Action to Ready, what you are really doing is using your Reaction to move your Action to another time.

Attack vs. attack (or does action have a meaning here?)

Upper case and lower case a have a meaning in the PHB, with the former being the Action described under Actions in Combat in the PHB.

When Ready asks you to choose your action, you use the actions listed there. The cases described in the PHB are "Use an Object" and "Movement" for the Ready (since you can only do one.)

In the case of this question, the Action that is being taken is Attack.

Attack Action on your turn

If you take the Attack action on your turn, then it comes with all the fun stuff that happen on your turn. This includes Extra Attack (which typically doesn't happen on a Ready whose trigger occurs NOT on your turn.)

In contrast, you can look at another reaction: Opportunity Attack. In this instance, the language does not say to take an action but to simply make a melee weapon attack. The difference is in the use of Action in the phrasing for Ready.

Actions vs attacks

The language in Ready is to choose the action. Actions are a defined term in the rules under Combat->Actions in Combat.

At other times, there is other language used when specifying melee/ranged/melee weapon/ranged weapon attacks. The language in Ready does not say to Ready an attack (lowercase a), it says to ready an action.

There are also several referenced examples of Ready Action and Extra Attack/Multiattack that reference the On your turn as the important qualifier. Had they not intended a Ready attack to be the Attack Action, then the discussion would have ended there and not referenced the turn requirements.

There are also other specific examples of more than one action on a turn that override that general rule: Cunning Action, Haste, Action Surge, etc.

Intent Support from Jeremy Crawford

The action choice intent (emphasis mine) is also provided by Crawford:

The Ready action lets you ready any action you can take, including Attack, but Extra Attack is on your turn.

Not only has he clearly stated that you take an Action, and that Action can be Attack (uppercase A), but that Extra Attack only functions on your turn.

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    \$\begingroup\$ So, essentially, you are taking the "Attack action as a reaction", similar to how you can take the Hide action as a bonus action with CA from Rogue? (Analogy by David Coffron in chat) \$\endgroup\$ – HellSaint May 29 '18 at 15:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ Can you reconcile the Cast a Spell readied action as well? That doesn't seem to fit here. \$\endgroup\$ – Apocalisp May 29 '18 at 16:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ According to JCraw, you cast the spell using the Ready action, not by taking a Cast a Spell action on your Reaction: sageadvice.eu/2017/09/15/… \$\endgroup\$ – Apocalisp May 29 '18 at 16:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Apocalisp Fair enough, but to counter (and change my tack), the spellcasting bit of Ready is different than the other bits (which Crawford did call taking the Attack action.) They added additional rules with spellcasting that make Spellcasting the exception to the Action rule. \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch May 29 '18 at 16:40
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Apocalisp That is not true in the case of Hide, as it clearly states in the rules text that you take the Hide Action as your bonus action. "Cunning Action. Starting at 2nd level, your quick thinking and agility allow you to move and act quickly. You can take a bonus action on each of your turns in combat. This action can be used only to take the Dash, Disengage, or Hide action." The Rogue does indeed take the Hide action as a bonus action. The rest of your comment is confusing, or confused itself. \$\endgroup\$ – Axoren May 29 '18 at 20:04
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Yes.

[...]Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger.

Even though the first action you take is Ready Action your response is -as quoted above- an Attack Action. Essentially you are using/exhausting/spending your reaction to take the readied action, in this case: Attack Action. So when the trigger happens during your turn you can choose to use up your reaction to take that Attack Action. As it is still your turn, you are able to use your Extra Attack.

SO...

Are you taking an Attack Action? Yes

Is it your turn? Yes

You meet the requirements for the Extra Attack feature. Hack, slash, stab away.


More on the "Are you taking an Attack Action?" logic:

(quotes are my own)

Each turn you have an action resource. General rule is:

You can use your action to take Attack Action, Hide Action, Ready Action, Dash Action and features that require an action etc.

Each round you have a reaction resource. General rule is:

Given you and your target meets the requirements you can make an Attack of Opportunity and some spells will use your reaction resource ,instead of your action resource, when cast.

Another way to use reaction resource is to use your action resource to take the Ready Action. The Ready Action rule lets you take a specific action when your trigger happens, using up your reaction resource if you do. In the end you use your action resource to take the Ready Action which in turn let's you use your reaction resource to take the Attack Action.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I think it still needs clarification on how a reaction can be treated as an action. They are inherently different, mechanically. \$\endgroup\$ – HellSaint May 29 '18 at 15:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ This answer needs a mechanical justification, possibly by quoting the rules for clarification. \$\endgroup\$ – Apocalisp May 29 '18 at 15:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ @NautArch it's right there in the quote: "[....]choose the action you will take [...]" Attack Action. There is no need to overcomplicate things. \$\endgroup\$ – FenrirG May 29 '18 at 16:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ @apocalisp the related rule is already quoted, it shows that what you do with that Ready action is taking the Attack action, and it is already told that the whole thing happens on your turn: equals to Extra Attack. \$\endgroup\$ – FenrirG May 29 '18 at 16:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ @HellSaint must've missed your comment. See if thinking this way clears it: you are not using reaction, you are spending your reaction to activate your Readied Action. In this case an Attack Action. \$\endgroup\$ – FenrirG May 29 '18 at 22:33
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No, not while being consistent with the rest of the rules.

Rules Text

Let's start with the relevant rules text.

First, Extra Attack (this is the text from the Fighter class, emphasis mine):

Beginning at 5th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn.

Second, the rules for the Ready action (relevant excerpt only, emphasis mine).

...[T]o get the jump on a foe or wait for a particular circumstance before you act... you can take the Ready action on your turn, which lets you act using your reaction before the start of your next turn.

First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger....

When the trigger occurs, you can either take your reaction right after the trigger finishes or ignore the trigger.

To summarize the emphasized parts: to benefit from Extra Attack, you must "take the Attack action on your turn." When you "take the Ready action on your turn" you can define a trigger and "choose the action you will take" in response to it. Then, when the trigger occurs, you can "take your reaction," and this counts as "act[ing] using your reaction."

The Only Two Cases

Clearly you're taking the Ready action on your turn. Not so clear is whether you count as also taking the Attack action as an action. By my reading, nothing says you're taking the readied action as an action; it says you can choose which action you'll take and then take it as a reaction.

However, it's splitting hairs to try to figure this out just by analyzing the grammar. After all, if the grammar were completely convincing, we wouldn't have multiple conflicting answers. Instead of focusing on those minutia, let's think about the big picture.

In the scenario given, either 1) you aren't "taking the Attack action on your turn" when it triggers on your own turn in response to a Ready action or 2) you are. That's it. So let's examine those two cases, along with my interpretations of them.

1) You aren't "taking the Attack action on your turn." You're taking the Ready action on your turn, but you're not actually taking the Attack action using your action. You're taking the Attack action using your reaction. Thus Extra Attack would not apply.

2) You are "taking the Attack action on your turn." You're taking both the Ready action on your turn and the Attack action on your turn, even if the latter is technically being used with your reaction. Thus Extra Attack would apply.

My Interpretations of the Two Cases

I argue that case #1 is the only interpretation that makes sense within the context and spirit of the rest of the rules, for the following reasons.

1) You aren't "taking the Attack action on your turn." This is consistent with the wording and intention of features like Cunning Action and Metamagic that let you use what is normally called an action using some non-action, in which case it's not considered to be taken as an action.

2) You are "taking the Attack action on your turn." This implies that you have gotten 2 actions on your turn, which is not normal (barring special features like Action Surge) and violates the rules of combat stating that "[o]n your turn, you can... take one action." To avoid creating a double standard, this also implies that if you readied the Attack action and it triggers on someone else's turn then you're taking 1 action (Ready) on your turn and 1 action (Attack) on someone else's turn, which violates the rules.

Room for Dissent

Even though these are the only 2 cases, you may disagree with my interpretations of those cases and my claim that #2 is inconsistent with the rules. In that case, feel free to go with #2... if you think it's okay to establish the slippery slopes that precedent allows.

Regardless, adopting scenario #2 and allowing that strategy serves virtually no purpose except to slow down turns. In my years of DM'ing multiple campaigns of 5e, I've never encountered a situation where intentionally readying an Attack action to occur later on one's own turn was tactically sensible. It has also never come up naturally. If it did, I would follow scenario #1 and deny the benefit of Extra Attack. I interpret the Ready action's opportunity cost in the action economy to give up a thorough turn in exchange for preparedness. In other words, when you take the Ready action, you don't get something for nothing; or, there ain't no such thing as a free Attack action.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The reason most people will disagree with #2 being a slippery slope is that it is a specific beats general case. As the accepted answer mentions, we already have other specific rules that override the general, for example, Cunning Action lets you take actions as a bonus action, and they are still treated as actions. The same could be said about the Ready action being an exception by itself, letting you take an action as a reaction. (at the cost of both your action and reaction) \$\endgroup\$ – HellSaint May 31 '18 at 2:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ Nonetheless I've upvoted the answer. I can see both readings as correct. The only reason I accepted the current accepted answer is because Crawford writes Attack (capital A) in his tweet, which refers to the action (that profits from Extra Attack). \$\endgroup\$ – HellSaint May 31 '18 at 2:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ There's a number of other strange interactions with interpretation #2 including the monk's Martial Arts feature, the fighter's Commander's Strike, and the bard's Battle Magic. \$\endgroup\$ – Apocalisp Jun 1 '18 at 0:08
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No.

The Combat section of the basic rules has everything you need to answer this question.

Quoting the section titled "Your Turn" (emphasis in original):

On your turn, you can move a distance up to your speed and take one action.

From the rule on Extra Attack (emphasis mine):

you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn.

From the rule on the Ready action (emphasis mine):

Sometimes you want to get the jump on a foe or wait for a particular circumstance before you act. To do so, you can take the Ready action on your turn, which lets you act using your reaction before the start of your next turn.

When you take the Ready action on your turn to attack using your reaction, the Extra Attack does not apply. It doesn't say "whenever you attack on your turn". It says "whenever you take the Attack action on your turn", which has a specific mechanical meaning in this context.

See the section on Actions in Combat from the Basic Rules. It's clear that:

  1. You get to take one action on your turn (unless a feature like Action Surge gives you more than one action).
  2. Whenever you take the Attack action on your turn, you can use the Extra Attack feature.
  3. When you take the Ready action on your turn, it doesn't allow you to use the Extra Attack feature.

Also, from the Attack action section in the combat rules:

Certain features, such as the Extra Attack feature of the Fighter, allow you to make more than one attack with this action.

The Ready action description just below that includes no mention of Extra Attack.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. \$\endgroup\$ – doppelgreener May 29 '18 at 18:41
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It depends on whether Reactions happen on your turn or not.

Based on some questions on this site (Casting multiple spells in a single round and Can a caster Counterspell a Counterspell against a non-cantrip spell they cast? for example) and discussions on ENWorld.org it is a not uncommon ruling that Reactions are not part of your turn. This interpretation means that even if you have cast a Bonus Action spell on your turn you can still use counterspell on that turn.

If your table follows this interpretation then Extra Attack does not apply to a readied attack on your turn.

In other words, expect table variation.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Using "other people say so/are arguing about it" without providing any substantial backup (e.g. quoting relevant rules or providing designer quotes that support that outlook) isn't helpful and doesn't make for a good rpg.se answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Purple Monkey May 30 '18 at 23:13
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    \$\begingroup\$ I assume reactions can happen on your own turn - which is RAW, and this is specifically defined in the question. Note that both links you mentioned from here say that you can take reactions in your turn. The link to ENWorld is a link to the home page of the forum, which doesn't tell us anything. \$\endgroup\$ – HellSaint Jun 1 '18 at 2:25

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