Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

35

The record seems to be 209 hours. According to this Reddit post, Reddit user JustOneAmongMany asked Guinness about an alleged 1985/6 record. Guinness responded on September 4, 2018 with this message: Thank you for contacting Guinness World Records. A search of our database shows two Dungeons & Dragons endurance records from that general time ...


24

Here are some suggestions that we have tried for our 4e game. It does not come up much as we do not have a high mortality campaign thus far. Have backup characters ready. In 4e we have had backup characters in the character builder ready to be printed if we needed them during a session. This can provide a quick pick up right back to where you left off by ...


16

When I run Dungeon World for a new group, I don't expect them to read anything before the game. I bring character sheets, and I always take a few moments to address the common points of confusion. "Okay, so you'll notice that you have two sets of stats. There are numbers in this fine print above your stat blocks, and you're going to assign the larger ...


16

Before I start, a note on perspective: the players don't know that the plot is at standstill and not moving forward; only you, the DM, knows. Give them a chance to advance their characters. Let them play their features and peculiarities, shop around, spend money, carouse, prepare for the next adventure. Do they like games of chance? Dragonchess? Indulge them!...


15

I was part of the 1985/86 group, at that time there was no official record. There was a 5 minute break every hour but you could stack them for a longer break. We did several 24 hour sessions beforehand to train. We were dosed up on coffee and coca cola. We practiced in Ilford but the record was set just off Trafalgar Square in some sort of basement of a ...


14

For background, I run an online session with people spanning an eight hour time difference. Our scheduling is generally a mess and we vary between 45 minute and 4 hour sessions depending on the day. I've picked up a few tricks to help things move more smoothly. Plan ahead A lot of time in-game is spent having either in- or out-of-character discussions ...


12

My latest group is mostly longtime roleplaying gamers and one relatively new gamer. I emailed them this, a link to the play kit, and a private share of the pdf: You don't have to read anything, but if you feel like reading something, read the Basic Moves (our bread and butter) and skim the classes to see what interests you. The players who want to read ...


11

Use a dynamic amount of content. You can't know how long that 3 page long dungeon will take to play. Instead prep the games in small chunks. Add more chunks as necessary during the game session. When you're approaching the end point, run the final segment of the game. As requested, here are some examples. I held off from posting them when I first ...


10

This varies somewhat by the tone of your campaign and the system/setting. In some systems/settings, resurrections are relatively easy. In that case, the obvious answer is to perform the resurrection with some sort of minor penalty and then go on. This, though, cheapens character death. In a mostly hack 'n slash, lighthearted game, this is perfectly fine ...


8

First of all, you need to choose a game that allows you to do that, which comes with the usual implications of making your group buy in. If you already play one of those, no problem. If you don't and your group still wants to use that system, then maybe someone else will write an answer about how to shorten combat encounters and create short missions. This ...


8

This post isn't in the best order, but just the order I came up with the major points Our game group used to start gaming on Thursday evenings and push through until Monday or Tuesday. We did take breaks though. That said, as the game group shifted and long-term gaming needed to be consistent, for the last 10+ years, the one consistency we've relied on is ...


7

The option that worked better for me (especially during a spell when I made my adventures quite hard and therefore I "killed" characters quite often...) was having each player use and develop a number of different characters at the same time. If one dies and can't be resurrected, you have the replacement ready... PS the players understood quite quickly the ...


7

One simple way for sandboxy games: Explain to the players that they need to get back to base by the end of the session. If they don’t, then you’ll roll on a table you’ve made up to determine what happens on their way back to base.


6

This thread suggests that the record was/is 100 hours in Dragon issue # 80, pg 54 it states that four members of the Broward Game Players Club in Hollywood FL played D&D for 100 hours straight. However that was back in 1983, so it might have been broken since then.


5

So, to add to some already great content, here are my ideas about this topic: Find a reason for them to go back home You should have a very clear reason to send them home at the end of the session, a reason that you should be so familiar with that you'll be able to adjust it to whatever the characters did to your dungeon in each and every session. It may ...


5

With such a constrained game time I have a few general tips that should work with any Table Top RPG. Scenes not Episodes: If you think of the game as a serial television show, most sessions are composed of roughly enough information and tension to fill one episode of the show. Try paring down each session to 1 element of an episode. Examples: Your party ...


5

Plan fun sessions, plot is secondary This is somewhat of a challenge to your premise, but bear with me. adonies' answer covers a lot of particulars that you can include. I will try to take a slightly different perspective. A session that doesn't advance the plot doesn't need to be planned any differently to one that does. When planning your sessions you ...


4

I tend to bring in new PCs who had some sort of relationship with the recently deceased PC. The nature of the relationship will vary, but it has to be strong enough that the new PC has a reason to show up hot on the heels of the death of the old PC. A few highly situation-dependent variations on this theme: Sibling who wants to prove worth to the family by ...


3

If you want a return to base type thing, I suggest giving the players a keep to come back too. Managing the keep will be a nice way to fade the episodes in and out. For your mega-dungeon: suppose the place has some sort of uber-guardian spirit that manifests on intruders at random times. To aviod this, one of the players develops a spell that auto-teleports ...


3

These are some of the things I have done in the past. Have a humanoid enemy turn coat and join the players. Allow the player to be a "short term" ghost. Have the player's essence enter an object but let the team know that soon the essence will be forced out.


3

Make sure it is cleaner and tidier than you found it.


3

Average is difficult to pin down. There's no good way to determine how long the "average" session is, because there's a great variety of content available. That said, the DDAL Content Catalog can provide some guidance on expected lengths. You could calculate an average based on all published content, but it wouldn't reflect popularity. Some content is ...


2

A certain James Wallis (whom I do not know) writes, on the forums of rpg.net: "Yeah, Dragonmeet (London, 1986, raising money for Band Aid) established the world record for non-stop AD&D at 84 hours, and we got into the appendix of the book for that year--we were too close to the print deadline to get a main entry. Subsequently an American team ...


2

Most universities will let clubs or individuals book seminar rooms. Those are nice as they contain a big table, a black board, and easy access to snack and drink machines.


2

Remember the basics of constructing a Mission. Weather, wilderness, animals, mice. Pick two primaries. If the Mission gets bigger than this, split it up. In this case, it sounds like you've got something big here, so you can productively split it up with an intermission in the middle to serve as a players' turn. There's nothing like a capital-C-for-game-...


2

As a player, you can pretty much play Dungeon World with nothing more for reference than the basic move sheet and your class playbook, both of which are provided in the standard play kit. You don't really need them in advance, but the curious aren't going to lose anything from having a look. But at game time, what you, as a GM, should be giving them to read ...


2

Here is a simple set of rules/guidelines that I follow to make sure my adventures can be played within a time-limit of four to six hours. Divide the adventure into the following three distinct parts Exposition This is the first part. It is where the players familiarize themselves with each other and their surroundings. It ends with the Presentation of ...


2

One idea that occurs to me is that the PCs are staging from some sort of mobile base - one that for some reason must move on at irregular intervals with it's occupants. It does not necessarily have to move far each time it moves, allowing for repeated access to some feature of the world the players/characters are interested in exploring, but the characters ...


2

A few quick suggestions: Keeping tabs on everything that happened This should be trivial. First, send out an email recap day of game. Second, spend literally five minutes where someone gives a "Last time we played" recap. Others should feel free to chime in, but this should still take no more than a few minutes. Remember - last session was short too, so ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible