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73

Short answer: Yes Christian and Christian-themed elements, in the very early years of Dragon Magazine, did in fact get some coverage. An article called The Politics of Hell in Dragon 28 (warning that it "cannot be considered the official doctrine of" AD&D) presented a history of Hell's struggle against God as played out on an interpretation of modern ...


71

I'm trained in conducting faith-based lessons for children focused on morality and virtues, in facilitating spiritual empowerment programs for junior youth, and in tutoring youth engaged in service-oriented community activities (this last one is my specialty). In both religious and non-religious contexts I've used role-playing as a forum for exploring ...


68

The largest issue here, from what I can tell, seems to be that your player is unwilling to accept anything outside of their current worldview, or paradigm. Regardless of what RPG system you use (at least almost, I'm sure there are exceptions), you're going to run into situations where the game's reality is fundamentally different from ours in some way. ...


66

Deal With This As You Would Any Player Overstep As it happens, I have had players try to insert real-world but inappropriate cultural influences into a setting of mine. In my case it was Japanese influences into a very European-themed fantasy world. But this was not so different from the time someone tried to bring Japanese influences into an actual ...


60

One of the major conceits of D&D’s gods is that their very presence powerfully affects reality around them. They literally cannot go anywhere without warping reality to be more in line with themselves—and that isn’t something that does you any favors with the other gods, even those who are otherwise friendly towards you. Showing up somewhere important, ...


59

I actually almost had a player like this He insisted to be a cleric of One God and make his character's main goal to punish daemon worshipers - that is, everybody who does not believe in One God. We talked. We tried to make him see how we are imagining a world from Greek mythology. He said his history teacher was Christian so he could call ancient Greeks ...


52

There is no mechanical or fluff requirement for a Paladin to follow a god. You've quoted the most relevant paragraph yourself, but for a backup, from the same page: Whether sworn before a god's altar and the witness of a priest, in a sacred glade before nature spirits and fey beings, or in a moment of desperation and grief with the dead as the only ...


41

[Establishes credibility: I have taught Sunday school/run church youth groups and have used role-play (both freeform and RPGs) in that context. Though, admittedly, never D&D. I have played plenty of D&D. I run the RPG group (which does include D&D) at a religious school where everything is expected to tie back to our religious mission. I've had ...


39

Let's say I, a first-level fighter, want to lift a mountain with my bare hands. Do I roll a strength check? No, because it's impossible. If Zeus is walking the earth, and some lowly mortal decides to attack him, they have absolutely no chance of harming this immortal Olympian. As the DM, you don't have to give them a chance. You strike Zeus' bare ...


37

Problem 1: the player doesn't understand player and DM roles This may not be solvable. And it may be. Don't play until this is settled. I tried to explain that it's a fictional universe in which there are different gods, to which the player responded, "No." Your first answer to this is "Yes, it is, and if you don't accept that, then you are unable ...


33

My question: Is this possible? Yes, it's possible, whether or not the fiend and the god/goddess get along. There is no RAW prohibition from the multiclass, no matter how awkward it looks. From a purely RAW standpoint, I don't think that Warlocks can lose their powers, but would his good deity even bother with someone who sold their soul to a devil? ...


33

Deities basically never come to the Material Plane. When they do, it has huge ramifications for that plane as well as for the Outer Planes, and that tends to cause lots of problems and anger all the other deities. Instead, they send avatars to the Material Plane—and even that is quite rare, because even that still causes a lot of trouble. Most of the stats ...


33

Paladins are not tied to their deity (or lack of a deity) any more than anyone else In previous editions, paladins gained their power from there dedication to their deity or alignment and could even lose their power if they failed to uphold it. Instead, in fifth edition, paladins get their power from their oath, which may or may not be made to a good deity. ...


32

Follow the Rule of Cool Not a RAW answer, but if your dm agrees with you, there's nothing wrong with you taking epic actions to take on a divine portfolio. For instance: Murdering a god, see Bhaal, Bane and Myrkul Achieving the simultaneous prayer of a million worshippers (See the Doctor's Crystal Dragon Jesus moment, here's the video for anyone that hasn'...


32

Alright, this is going to delve into both canon and conjecture, as it must for such a nebulous topic. I'll break them down so we know which is which. The Many Gods of the Dead As has been noted (correctly), the Wall of the Faithless was established by Myrkul. His successor Cyric kept the Wall erected largely out of malice and sadism, never questioning its ...


32

This is not homebrew. Quite the opposite, the Dungeon Master's Guide mentions dualism as a valid religious system, see page 11, "Other Religious Systems", emphasis mine: In your campaign, you can create pantheons of gods who are closely linked in a single religion, monotheistic religions (worship of a single deity), dualistic systems (centered on two ...


31

(Background: I am also a Christian, along with several of the people in my gaming group.) tl;dr -- The fictional god of your fictional world is not the God of our universe. Make the fictional god clearly distinct from our God. Figure out how much of what the party knows about that god is true. Define what you mean by "God" in your game world. Your game ...


31

I can make things up on the fly based on his dogma, but that would hardly be quoting, would it? Actually, it would be quoting. Your character can't make up scripture and call it a quote, but you can. You, as the player, have agency to add material to the world you are playing in. How much of the world you can edit is dependent upon your game's play-style ...


31

Azuth from FR might be a candidate. He is not a god of magic, but of wizards, and is mostly interested in the structured study of magic. From wikipedia: The clerics of Azuth teach wisdom and restraint. This means that Azuth is often not the favoured god of sorcerers with their fiery, instinctual use of magic, and bards with their somewhat fanciful ...


30

One player should not be allowed to force his personal views on the other players. If he has a problem with Paladins, he's not going to react well to Clerics either. This player needs to realize that the game world is not the real world, and it does not need to conform to his ideas of how the real world works. There are other stories - Greek and Roman, ...


29

Firstly, Paladins do not need to worship a god at all, since "Although many paladins are devoted to gods of good, a paladin's power comes as much from a commitment to justice as it does from a god." (PHB, pg. 82) To actually answer your question, though, yes a PC may worship several gods if they wish. This is outlined in the PHB, pg 293: From among the ...


28

In the Forgotten Realms, Deities are those whom Ao has officially marked as deities. This answer is generally true for previous editions of Forgotten Realms. It's possible that some changes may be made for 5th edition, though the Forgotten Realms is generally pretty good about maintaining continuity (including various cataclysms to explain edition changes)...


27

This is a rough situation to be in, and is one that I have actually dealt with before. I tried approaching it from three different angles (and one of them actually worked). Approach 1 - Nature of Fiction This was my first approach, and it went over poorly...but I'll share it here for posterity's sake. I tried to approach the discussion from the ...


26

You have some choices Your cleric's and your god's alignment do not have to exactly align. There is an Elven Chaotic Good deity, Aerdrie Faenya, whose domains are Tempest and Trickery. (Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide, p 23). CG god, Tempest domain, and your character embraces lawfulness in the cause of Good. There is also Deep Sashelas, Chaotic Good ...


25

Blame R.A. Salvatore. Lolth was represented in several D&D Works, from 1978 to 1987. The discrepancy arrived with the Crystal Shard in 1988. It was later corrected in Exile, with reason given Drizzt quietly recounted to Belwar the story of the [...] decision to forsake his kin and their evil deity, Lloth. Belwar realized that Drizzt was talking ...


24

The rules don't explicitly state what happens when a cleric without a deity takes the War domain. I don't feel there's any harm in letting the player choose whichever martial or simple weapon they like as their patron weapon. Excluding exotic weapons closes the door on most exploits while still letting the player flavor their character they way they want. ...


24

All clerics can use healing magic. Per the descriptions in the Player's Handbook, a cleric's magic comes from their deity: Divine magic, as the name suggests, is the power of the gods, flowing from them into the world. Clerics are conduits for that power, manifesting it as miraculous effects. (PHB, p. 56) Clerics can serve an evil god. Whether a ...


24

With their supernatural powers of remote sensing. As it happens, there is a 3e sourcebook called Deities and Demigods which contains a wealth of material about deities, both from a creative perspective (how to design your own pantheons etc.) and a mechanical one - presenting rules for how to mechanically represent gods in 3e D&D. A 3.5e version was not ...


23

In all my reading of Realms material over the years, I've never seen the “Roman” approach to other pantheons practiced or even referenced. Other pantheons are generally acknowledged as real, just foreign—a natural effect of living in a world where the individual gods regularly and undeniably manifest in person. Instead, what you tend to see mentioned while ...


23

Yes. In the original Forgotten Realms setting, the supplement Old Empires by Scott Bennie detailed the realms of Mulhorand, Unther, and Chessentea. The Untheric pantheon, in particular, was ruled by Gilgeam: Enlil himself retired; he appointed his son, Gilgeam, as his successor as king of the gods. At first, Gilgeam was a just ruler. But sometimes even ...


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