61

Rolling 12d20 and taking the 6 highest is not equivalent Taking the 6 highest rolls out of 12d20 is not equivalent to 6 attacks with advantage. It is significantly better. I could lay out the probability argument, but it's easier to cherry-pick an example that demonstrates the difference. Let's say you roll your 6 attacks with advantage. On the first 3 ...


54

Let's break this down a little bit using the Basic Rules you have available. Page 73: Attack Rolls To make an attack roll, roll a d20 and add the appropriate modifiers. If the total of the roll plus modifiers equals or exceeds the target’s Armor Class (AC), the attack hits. Pretty straight forward. You roll a D20 and add modifiers, in your ...


52

The rule on modifiers applies only after you've determined a base roll. And to do that you must first resolve disadvantage (PHB page 173): Use the higher of the two rolls if you have advantage, and use the lower roll if you have disadvantage. Therefore, you always take the lower roll. This is a direct inverse of this answer here for rolling a critical ...


51

Apparently, you cannot. At least not any more. Jeremy Crawford, the official rules sage of Wizards of the Coast, was asked in December 2015: @JeremyECrawford Can I cancel a "Natural 20 Critical Hit" using Cutting Words? 9:26 PM - 2 Dec 2015 He responded at that time: @LeonardoNocchi Yes, you can. 6:48 PM - 3 Dec 2015 My reasoning at that time for ...


51

About 27%, or a little over 1/4 This is a pretty easy calculation to run in anydice: As you can see, the percentage chance of rolling at least a 19 one of the d20 rolls is 27.10% So you can expect, on average, to crit a little over once in every four attacks made in this manner. How do you calculate that without a simulation? The probability of getting ...


50

The attacking enemy has disadvantage on the roll. The relevant quote from the PHB is here: If circumstances cause a roll to have both advantage and disadvantage, you are considered to have neither of them, and you roll one d20... In such a situation, you have neither advantage nor disadvantage. It's pretty clear that, in order for the advantage ...


48

No, it does not. To resolve a spell, you just read the spell's description and follow those instructions. Unless it explicitly asks for an attack roll, you don't make one. See the chapter on Spells (page 205 in the PHB, or here in the basic rules): Some spells require the caster to make an attack roll to determine whether the spell effect hits the ...


39

No, the creature still loses its head The effect of the vorpal sword is explicit: ...and roll a 20 on the attack roll, you cut off one of the creature's heads. This wording in the item description implies that the beheading effect is completely distinct from the effect of a critical hit. Reducing the result of the attack from a critical hit to a regular ...


34

The Special Sense Blindsense bypasses the mechanics of being Invisible The Invisible condition states (emphasis mine): An invisible creature is impossible to see without the aid of magic or a special sense. Blindsight is a special type of sense, along with senses like True Sight and Tremorsense. The condition explicitly calls out that there are ...


33

No. You get to wait to see if the attack would hit you. It's specifically a reaction to when you were hit and it allows you to rewind and replay the attack as if you'd cast shield before it (using the original attack roll). See the text: Casting Time: 1 reaction, which you take when you are hit by an attack or targeted by the magic missile spell ... ...


33

You should have made a total of 3 attack rolls - 1 for the staff, and 1 for each unarmed strike in the Flurry of Blows. Every time you make an attack, you should make an attack roll. This is, actually, the definition of an attack: If there’s ever any question whether something you’re doing counts as an attack, the rule is simple: if you’re making an ...


33

According to this tweet by Mike Mearls, you're supposed to know with certainty whether the shield is enough to protect you or not, so that you can't waste the spell, unless you choose to: Querent: Am I right..Wiz should know roll before using Shield,cant 'waste it' from not knowing roll? Mike Mearls: correct This is also how I have seen it be done ...


32

The +7 that D&D Beyond shows next to your Longbow attack is what you should add to your attack roll. D&D Beyond adds the +3 Dexterity modifier that you circled, the +2 Proficiency Bonus that you circled, and an additional +2 (probably from Archery fighting style) to come up with the total +7.


28

Player's Handbook, page 194: Rolling 1 or 20 [...] If the d20 roll for an attack is a 20, the attack hits regardless of any modifiers or the target's AC. In addition, the attack is a critical hit, as explained later in this chapter. If the d20 roll for an attack is a 1, the attack misses regardless of any modifiers or the target's AC. Pretty ...


27

Whether it hits Usually, the DM asks your AC before the play, and they take a note behind the screen. When they roll an attack behind the screen, they can immediately determine whether it hits or not. In this style, the DM only announces the hit, and not the total roll. However, your group has been using the other style: announcing the total attack roll. ...


27

Yes, you can reroll a 1 (or a 20) Rolling a 1 or a 20 on an attack roll technically means the result is going to miss or hit. However, that does not necessarily mean the outcome is decided. There are abilities out there (like Lucky itself!) that can modify rolls and so there are even rare cases where your 1 or 20 might get modified after the roll but before ...


27

No You must use the same ability modifier for damage and attack. Basic Rules, Damage and Healing When attacking with a weapon, you add your ability modifier--the same modifier used for the attack roll--to the damage. Impact of House-ruling this It makes certain multiclasses more powerful and makes the already-powerful DEX ability score even more ...


27

Probability of at least one crit The Great Weapon Master feat allows making an extra attack when scoring a critical or reducing a creature to zero hit points. I'll not cover the latter case since its probability is very situational, and the former has no relevance here since the extra attack only happens if one already scored a critical hit. The easy way to ...


25

Yes, you're understanding it correctly. You roll your attack roll for the bow with proficiency and Dex modifier, and damage with just Dex.


25

The original reason was to differentiate the Fighting Man from the other classes as a combat specialist The original Strength bonus to hit, solely available to Fighting Men (what we now call Fighters/Martials) was not introduced until the Greyhawk Supplement to OD&D (1 Feb 1975, TSR). In the first combat system, the only original bonus "+ to hit" ...


24

The answer is on page 246 of the DMG. Armor Class. An object's Armor Class is a measure of how difficult it is to deal damage to the object when striking it (because the object has no chance of dodging out of the way). The Object Armor Class table provides suggested AC values for various substances. So in the case of attacking object AC means ...


24

Dueling doesn't work with ranged weapons Specifically, the Dueling fighting style requires you to be: wielding a melee weapon in one hand Longbows and crossbows are ranged weapons, and in addition to that, longbows require you to use two hands (see the two-handed property). Thus the +2 from the Dueling fighting style shouldn't be added to the damage of ...


23

Dexterity Every Firearm in the DMG (p. 268) is a Ranged weapon. And the rules state (PHB, p. 194) the ability modifier used for a ranged weapon attack is Dexterity. If the creature using the firearm is proficient with them (up to the DM to determine), then they would also add their proficiency bonus to the roll to hit (but not the roll to damage, which ...


22

All of the information presented below is gathered and derived from the stated rules found in Chapter 9: Combat, of the Player's Handbook for 5th Edition D&D, starting with page 189. Any additional rules (or effects, like from spells) cite their origin. Attack Bonus There are four parts that get added together: Your Ability Modifier For most Melee ...


22

You "make a spell attack" as described on PHB p.205: you roll a d20 and add your proficiency bonus and spellcasting modifier. (Given that you're probably a druid, that'll be d20+PROF+WIS.) Damage is then 3d6 + nothing, or more if you cast above 2nd-level.


21

All spell casting gets the bonus, regardless of class. Since the robe does not specify that your DC and attack bonuses for spell casting are tied to a particular class, it should affect all of them. To paraphrase the typical comment given by the lead designer, "If the rules meant to limit your bonus to a particular class, they would say so." :)


21

As @KRyan says, there is no such feat. However, what you're looking for does exist in a class feature. 3 levels of War Chanter allow you to use Bardic Music to Inspire Recklessness in yourself and your allies, letting you (and them) take a penalty to AC up to your BAB and add it to your attack bonus. You may also be interested in the Shock Trooper feat, ...


20

A potion of growth or an enlargement spell By changing to medium size, temporarily, that disadvantage will go away. Both the potion and the spell make that possible. Comment: this point got some discussion early in this edition's release. (This question is related but not identical, as is this one). This little piece of verisimilitude -- which ...


19

If it misses initially, it fizzles out. The text for Witch Bolt is clear that it only takes effect on a hit: Make a ranged spell attack against that creature. On a hit, the target takes 1d12 lightning damage, and on each of your turns for the duration, you can use your action to deal 1d12 lightning damage to the target automatically. On a miss, the ...


19

Missing AC just means you dealt no damage it doesn't mean you didn't hit Failing to hit, or 'missing' a target's AC, is just an abstraction to indicate that you did not deal damage to the target. How this occurs varies significantly based on each character, but take the following example for a Barbarian whose AC is 10 + Dex + Con: Bruto the Barbarian's ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible